Next Technique in the Fake News War: Flagging Photoshopped Images

Home / Next Technique in the Fake News War: Flagging Photoshopped Images

Next Technique in the Fake News War: Flagging Photoshopped Images

Fake news and misinformation travel through social media platforms in text posts, photos and videos.  Therefore, tech companies try to control their spread using algorithms and artificial intelligence, but combating misinformation is not easy. This is why social networking sites look for new ways to prevent fake news.  A recent approach is flagging photoshopped images.

Making it easier to identify photoshopped images

Fake news has become a tool for both political and economic gain.  Some people spread fake news to drive more clicks, get more followers, and make more profit. However, others spread it to influence public opinion, and even elections.

Instagram recently decided to flag photoshopped images as part of its efforts to restrain fake news. One blogger described Instagram’s decision by saying that it looks like “Instagram x Facebook will start tagging false photos/digital art.”

The new feature will add a warning on images which Instagram considers digitally altered. Users who want to see the actual image can view the image by simply clicking on it. With a click, they can read why Instagram hid the image.

Another step in a constantly changing battle

Instagram’s step of flagging photoshopped images tries to include transparency in the process.  The flagged images will be blurred, and users who click on them will see the names of the sources and fact-checkers involved.

 

RKN Global

About RKN Global

RKN Global’s founder, Ronald Noble, fought corruption on all fronts as INTERPOL’s Secretary General from 2000 to 2014. At INTERPOL, Ronald Noble discovered a link between corruption and fraudulent passports and identity documents. Ronald Noble believes that by fighting corruption and improving the quantity and quality of passport screening, the world will become a safer place.